Skip to main content

2 Minutes Guide to Twitter

I started using Twitter recently and I really like it. Twitter is basically a website that allows you to micro-blog.  I find the idea of micro-blogging fascinating because a blog takes a lot of time and effort to maintain, whereas writing a micro-blog entry (it’s called a tweet on Twitter) simply takes few seconds.

However, I was quite lost when I first start twittering. I saw many tweets contain strange symbols and I had no idea what they meant. Following are the three most widely used Twitter commands:

  1. @reply – Any tweet started with @<user name> (e.g. “@oscarkuo is a reply”) will be placed in the reply tab of the user’s Twitter home page.
  2. #tags – Tagging helps to organise tweets just like how you would tag your E-mails in your Gmail account or blog entries on your blog. The only difference is that #tags works across everyone’s tweet, not just your tweet. Basically the idea is you put the hash symbol (#) in front of a keyword in a tweet. For example the Twitter update “my #iphone rocks” essentially tagged this tweet with the category #iphone. You can then use Twitter’s search or other community websites such as Hashtags to track these tags.
  3. RT (ReTweet) – This is  basically a way of forwarding a tweet to your Twitter followers. This is not really an official Twitter feature but people place “RT” in front of the message followed by @<user name> to indicate that they are forwarding someone else’s tweet (e.g. “RT @oscarkuo iphone rocks”).

Many people said to me that they prefer Facebook status updates over Twitter. However, to me they serve two different groups of audience. I tweet about tasty foods, funny jokes or good podcasts on twitter. On the other hand, when I want to talk about more private stuff such as work and family I write them on Facebook status updates.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Load Testing ASP.NET Sites with JMeter

Following my previous post about using JMeter to test MOSS, I tried to figure out what are the bare minimum requirements of using JMeter against a plain ASP.NET website. I wrote a very simple ASP.NET web application with just a button, a text fields and a static label. This application displays the content of a text file in the static label when it loads and write content of the text field back to the file when the button is clicked.I found all I need to do in order to script this using JMeter is to extract __VIEWSTATE and __EVENTVALIDATION fields then send them back in the update request. My JMeter test plain looks like this:

Load Testing SharePoint (MOSS) Sites with JMeter

I have used JMeter for load testing few non-ASP.NET web sites before, however I could not get it to work with ASP.NET web sites. This is mainly due to ASP.NET ViewState and event validations, which stops a recorded JMeter script from being played back.Recently I worked on a MOSS project and we were looking for tools to perform load testing on the server. Many people said the load testing tool in Microsoft Team System for Testers works well with MOSS. However, it is quite expensive so I decided to give JMeter another go. After several hours of hacking, I actually got it to work and here’s how I did it.My test page is the pretty standard MOSS edit document property screen with few extra text fields added and the goal here is to use a JMeter script to change the document properties. Once I have a working script, I can configure JMeter to fire hundreds of instances of this script simultaneously to simulate the user workload.As shown in the screenshot below, the test plan contains two HTTP…

Installing the WTL Application Wizard in Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition

I love Google Chrome, it is fast, elegant and beautiful. After I realized that it was written using WTL, I felt quite keen to learn about this library.I downloaded WTL 8.0 from SourceForge.net and Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition from Microsoft.com only to realise that there is no WTL Wizard support for Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition. WTL 8.0 ships with WTL/ATL application wizard but the setup script only supports the Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition (setup80x.js). However, the good news is that you can make it work with Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition in few simple steps:Make a copy of the setup80x.js and rename it to setup90x.js. Open setup90x.js up and do a global search and replace from “8.0” to “9.0”.
Save the file and execute it. If you are as lucky as I am, you should see a dialog that tells you that the wizard has been successfully installed.Now, when you run Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition and go File –> New –> Project… you should now see the new WTL/ATL Application…